chesapeake bluesChesapeake Blues (Math 6)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Math (6.1, 6.2, 6.14, 6.15)

How do scientists know how many crabs are in the Bay? Did they catch them all and count them? How do they know if a crab has been counted before? These questions are all answered mathematically as we model population counting using probability and proportional reasoning.

 

  


 

spoiler alertSpoiler Alert (Math 6)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Math (6.2, 6.6) Math (6.2, 6.5)

The biggest secret in Hollywood is locked away and your students’ fraction number sense is the only way to break out. Can your students use fraction circles to solve the different brain teasers to earn the correct lock combinations for this BreakoutEdu lesson?

Lesson Requirement: Students must have access to a computer.

 


lego my math oLego My Math-O - NEW! (Math 7)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Math 7 (7.4, 7.6, 7.8, 7.11, 7.13, 7.14)

Legos® are the building blocks of children’s imaginations while the Engineering Design Process is the building block of engineering. Bring them together through a series of design and build challenges based on the seventh grade standards of learning. Each task will demonstrate and strengthen your students’ understanding of a math concept, as they use their imagination to create.

  


coding with ozobotsCoding with Ozobots - NEW! (Math 7)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Math (7.7)

The Ozobot® is a programmable robot that allows students to use reasoning and problem solving skills to develop code for performing various tasks. Using drag and drop programming, this lesson will engage students in the complex world of quadrilaterals as they program their Ozobot® to construct different shapes. Students will build connections between the coding language and the characteristics of quadrilaterals as they develop their programming skills.

Lesson Requirement: Students must have access to a computer for this lesson. 

 


   

wrap and fillWrap and Fill (Math 8)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Math (8.7)

Would you rather have an ice cream cylinder or an ice cream cone? Should the Egyptians have built rectangular prisms instead of pyramids? Explore how the relationships between volumes and surface areas of geometric solids are applied in the real world.

 

 


zombie apocalypseZombie Apocalypse (Math 8)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Math (8.12, 8.13, 8.17)

Would you rather have an ice cream cylinder or an ice cream cone? Should the Egyptians have built rectangular prisms instead of pyramids? Explore how the relationships between volumes and surface areas of geometric solids are applied in the real world.

 

 


  

gearing up for variationGearing Up for Variation (Algebra 1)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Algebra I (A.8)

Variation is a topic with which many students struggle. During this lesson, students will explore both inverse and direct variation within the context of mechanical gears. Hands-on exploration will help students develop the equations for variation as well as a better understanding of the related scientific principles.

 


get your bearingsGet Your Bearings (Algebra 1)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Math (A.1, A.6); 2016 Math (A.1, A.6)

Students can have a hard time fully understanding slope and the slope intercept form of an equation of a line. During this lesson, students will participate in a math/science integrated activity to generate data that will then be used to identify the important characteristics that define a linear equation.

Lesson Requirement: Students must have access to a computer and the Internet. 

 


 

graph maniaGraph Mania (Algebra 1)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Math (A.1); 2016 Math (A.9)

Your students will enjoy participating in hands-on activities to collect multiple data sets. Using a graphing calculator, they will then make scatterplots and determine the curve of best fit for each data set. Both linear and quadratic models will be incorporated into the lesson.

 


it all comes out in the washersIt All Comes Out in the Washers (Algebra 1)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Algebra I (A.9), 2016 Math (AII.11, AFDA.7)

If your students are a little confused about statistics and think a "normal distribution" describes the usual way you pass out assignments while a z-score refers to a musical number written by Zorro, this lesson is for you. Students will be actively engaged in this engineering-based lesson and will see how z-scores are used in real life to help make important business decisions.

 


lego animal factoryLEGO Animal Factory (Algebra 1)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Math (A.1 & A.4), 2016 Math (A.1 & A.4), Technology: C/T 6-8.9B, C/T 9-12.11C

Join the workforce at a LEGO® factory! We will take a look at the rate of brick production and the profitability of different building sets. You will also have an opportunity to create a new design for the company to sell.

Lesson Requirement: Students must have access to a computer.

 


start your enginesStart Your Engines (Algebra 1)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Algebra 1 (A.10), 2016 Math (8.12)

How fast is your reaction time? If a $20 bill is dropped right in front of you, can you catch it? How is reaction time important to a successful race car driver? Using data collected in class, students will create box and whisker plots to display, analyze, and compare their reaction time results. Find out if you are ready to become a race car driver!

 


everybodys doing the logomotionEverybody's Doing the Logomotion (Geometry)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Geometry (G.11)

Logo design is a billion dollar business. Where did logos originate and what goes into the making of a successful logo? Have you ever noticed how many logos have a circular shape? Students will create their own circular logos using diameters, radii, chords, secants, tangents, arcs, central angles, and inscribed angles. A discovery activity using angles and arcs will enhance the understanding of circle relationships. Based on specific criteria, which student in your class will win the Logo Design Competition?

 


 

let it snowLet It Snow (Geometry)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Geometry (G.10, G.13)

What does self-assembly in nanotechnology have to do with geometry? Plenty! Ice crystals naturally self-assemble into snowflakes as hexagonal prisms. Students will discover the science of self-assembly by demonstrating problem-solving skills. Patterns will be investigated when looking at interior and exterior polygon angle measures in order to derive algebraic formulas. The volume of a hexagonal prism model will be explored to determine its effectiveness in delivering cancer drugs to medical patients.

 


opening the lines of communicationOpening the Lines of Communication (Geometry)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Geometry (G2)

Why are parallel lines so important? How do parallel lines communicate with us? In this lesson, students will actively explore parallel lines and the angle relationships formed when they are intersected by a transversal. Students will also develop skills to prove when lines are parallel using real life situations and discuss why these parallel lines are important.

 


  

graph maniaGraph Mania (Algebra 2, AFDA)

Standards of Learning: 2016 Math (AII.9, AFDA.3)

Ever get tired of the age old question, "When are we ever going to have to use this?" Through some real-life application models, students will discover interesting data-collection activities for displaying lines and curves of best fit. Linear, quadratic, and exponential equations will be modeled using data collected from various hands-on activities. Equations of best fit will be determined using a graphing calculator.

 


 

whats normalWhat's Normal? (Algebra 2)

Standards of Learning: 2009 Algebra II (All.11)

After taking their blood pressures, students will review properties of the normal curve. Students will then use the standard normal probability table or a graphing calculator to find probabilities and draw conclusions associated with this real-life context.